Visit Boden

Defense Museum Boden

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Take an exciting journey through Swedish defense history from the late 19th century to the present day. A time-travel through war and peace with a touch of history.

Försvarsmuseum är ett modernt museum med interaktiva utställningar. Museet riktar sig till både stora och små – helt enkelt till alla som vill ha större kunskap om de skeenden som präglat svensk försvarshistoria. Klättra in i stridsvagnen, sätt er vid spakarna i helikoptern och ”flyg” iväg. Här finner ni också ett café och en trevlig museibutik med bland annat historisk litteratur.

FÖRSVARSMUSEET
Granatvägen 2
961 43 Boden

helena.e.svanberg@boden.se
+46 921 628 00

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Therefore, things like littering, destroying nature and long-term tent camps are violations of the right of public access.

Under the right of public access, you can go almost anywhere in nature, but not too close to houses. You may also spend one or two nights on someone else's land, pick flowers, berries and mushrooms as long as they are not protected, and swim, boat and paddle in waterways.

However, you are not allowed to pass over plots of land, gardens, plantations or fields with growing crops. You are also not allowed to drive motorized vehicles in the countryside, damage trees or bushes, or harm animals.

An important part of the right of public access is to always take all rubbish from the place you have visited. Litter destroys nature and risks making animals sick if they eat it. Rubbish is also boring to look at. If you find any, feel free to take other people's litter with you. Together we can ensure that the right of public access continues to function as it was intended.

The right of public access - what does it mean?

Friluftsfrämjandet protects the right of public access to preserve outdoor environments and make outdoor life possible for everyone. But why does the right of public access exist and what does it mean?

What is the right of public access?

Allemansrätten is a crucial prerequisite for outdoor recreation in Sweden. It allows us to hike, paddle and camp almost anywhere we want. Around 80% of the land in Sweden is owned by private individuals and companies, but thanks to the right of public access, we can move around on private land and roads. How amazing is that?

However, the right of public access is not only a right but also an obligation. When we spend time in nature, it is important to show consideration for nature, wildlife, landowners and other visitors.

The rules of the right of public access

The right of public access is included in the Constitution, but is technically not a law. However, it is surrounded by laws that set limits on what is allowed. The basic rule is not to disturb or destroy.

The right of public access - what does it mean?

Friluftsfrämjandet protects the right of public access to preserve outdoor environments and make outdoor life possible for everyone. But why does the right of public access exist and what does it mean?

What is the right of public access?

Allemansrätten is a crucial prerequisite for outdoor recreation in Sweden. It allows us to hike, paddle and camp almost anywhere we want. Around 80% of the land in Sweden is owned by private individuals and companies, but thanks to the right of public access, we can move around on private land and roads. How amazing is that?

However, the right of public access is not only a right but also an obligation. When we spend time in nature, it is important to show consideration for nature, wildlife, landowners and other visitors.

The rules of the right of public access

The right of public access is included in the Constitution, but is technically not a law. However, it is surrounded by laws that set limits on what is allowed. The basic rule is not to disturb or destroy.

Therefore, things like littering, destroying nature and long-term tent camps are violations of the right of public access.

Under the right of public access, you can go almost anywhere in nature, but not too close to houses. You may also spend one or two nights on someone else's land, pick flowers, berries and mushrooms as long as they are not protected, and swim, boat and paddle in waterways.

However, you are not allowed to pass over plots of land, gardens, plantations or fields with growing crops. You are also not allowed to drive motorized vehicles in the countryside, damage trees or bushes, or harm animals.

An important part of the right of public access is to always take all rubbish from the place you have visited. Litter destroys nature and risks making animals sick if they eat it. Rubbish is also boring to look at. If you find any, feel free to take other people's litter with you. Together we can ensure that the right of public access continues to function as it was intended.