Visit Boden

Boden

Welcome to the Råne River Valley  

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Discover Gunnarsbyn, Lassbyn, Överstbyn, Norriån, Valvträsk and Sörbyn - villages that adorn the banks of the Råne River Valley. Here on Sweden's longest untouched forest river you can experience fishing, hiking, canoeing and much more. Both on your own or together with one of the knowledgeable activity guides who work in the area. Experience the undeveloped forest river with a strong sense of togetherness and hospitality in the countryside where the tourism industry is thriving. Visitors from all over the world have found their way here in recent years, thanks to the burgeoning development of nature tourism in the area, where you will find facilities such as Arctic Retreat, Aurora Safari Camp (Winner of the Great Tourism Award 2023) and Sörbyn Lodge.   

Be inspired by the local culture with historical sites and traditional events. In the Råne river valley there is a rich association life, activities and events in village farms. Gunnarsbyn's Folkets hus has a digital cinema with current films. There is a general store and fuel station in Gunnarsbyn. After Råneälv, there are also rest areas, camping, overnight cabins and campsites that can be used by the public. Whether you are looking for exciting winter walks along the Malmen road, shopping in local shops or tasty adventures in the world of gastronomy, the Råne river valley has something for you.  

For more information visit Råneälvdals service point and infoPoint 

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Therefore, things like littering, destroying nature and long-term tent camps are violations of the right of public access.

Under the right of public access, you can go almost anywhere in nature, but not too close to houses. You may also spend one or two nights on someone else's land, pick flowers, berries and mushrooms as long as they are not protected, and swim, boat and paddle in waterways.

However, you are not allowed to pass over plots of land, gardens, plantations or fields with growing crops. You are also not allowed to drive motorized vehicles in the countryside, damage trees or bushes, or harm animals.

An important part of the right of public access is to always take all rubbish from the place you have visited. Litter destroys nature and risks making animals sick if they eat it. Rubbish is also boring to look at. If you find any, feel free to take other people's litter with you. Together we can ensure that the right of public access continues to function as it was intended.

The right of public access - what does it mean?

Friluftsfrämjandet protects the right of public access to preserve outdoor environments and make outdoor life possible for everyone. But why does the right of public access exist and what does it mean?

What is the right of public access?

Allemansrätten is a crucial prerequisite for outdoor recreation in Sweden. It allows us to hike, paddle and camp almost anywhere we want. Around 80% of the land in Sweden is owned by private individuals and companies, but thanks to the right of public access, we can move around on private land and roads. How amazing is that?

However, the right of public access is not only a right but also an obligation. When we spend time in nature, it is important to show consideration for nature, wildlife, landowners and other visitors.

The rules of the right of public access

The right of public access is included in the Constitution, but is technically not a law. However, it is surrounded by laws that set limits on what is allowed. The basic rule is not to disturb or destroy.

The right of public access - what does it mean?

Friluftsfrämjandet protects the right of public access to preserve outdoor environments and make outdoor life possible for everyone. But why does the right of public access exist and what does it mean?

What is the right of public access?

Allemansrätten is a crucial prerequisite for outdoor recreation in Sweden. It allows us to hike, paddle and camp almost anywhere we want. Around 80% of the land in Sweden is owned by private individuals and companies, but thanks to the right of public access, we can move around on private land and roads. How amazing is that?

However, the right of public access is not only a right but also an obligation. When we spend time in nature, it is important to show consideration for nature, wildlife, landowners and other visitors.

The rules of the right of public access

The right of public access is included in the Constitution, but is technically not a law. However, it is surrounded by laws that set limits on what is allowed. The basic rule is not to disturb or destroy.

Therefore, things like littering, destroying nature and long-term tent camps are violations of the right of public access.

Under the right of public access, you can go almost anywhere in nature, but not too close to houses. You may also spend one or two nights on someone else's land, pick flowers, berries and mushrooms as long as they are not protected, and swim, boat and paddle in waterways.

However, you are not allowed to pass over plots of land, gardens, plantations or fields with growing crops. You are also not allowed to drive motorized vehicles in the countryside, damage trees or bushes, or harm animals.

An important part of the right of public access is to always take all rubbish from the place you have visited. Litter destroys nature and risks making animals sick if they eat it. Rubbish is also boring to look at. If you find any, feel free to take other people's litter with you. Together we can ensure that the right of public access continues to function as it was intended.